Chapter 13: Electronic Commerce and Information Security

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Chapter 13 ElectronicCommerce andInformation SecurityInvitation to Computer Science Java Version Third Edition.
ObjectivesIn this chapter you will learn about E commerce Databases Information security.
Invitation to Computer Science Java Version Third Edition 2 Introduction E commerce Financial transactions conductedby electronic means Early days early and mid 1990s of online.
A customer fills out an order via the Web andsubmits it The online order is printed out by the business and then processed like a traditional purchaseInvitation to Computer Science Java Version Third Edition 3.
Introduction continued E business Every part of a financial transaction is handledelectronically including Order processing.
Credit verification Transaction completion Debit issuing Shipping alerts Inventory reduction.
Invitation to Computer Science Java Version Third Edition 4 E commerce Opening an online store requires at least asmuch planning as building another physical storeInvitation to Computer Science Java Version Third Edition 5.
The Vision Thing In planning for opening an online store acompany must identify Its objectives Risks involved.
Costs involved The company should go ahead with its plansonly if it is determined that its overall bottom linewill improve by going onlineInvitation to Computer Science Java Version Third Edition 6.
Decisions Decisions Personnel In house development or outsourcing Hardware Web server machine.
Additional computersInvitation to Computer Science Java Version Third Edition 7 Decisions Decisions continued Software programs to.
Process customer orders Interact with accounting shipping and inventorycontrol software Manage and store customer informationInvitation to Computer Science Java Version Third Edition 8.
Anatomy of a Transaction Goals for an online business Draw potential customers to your site Keep them there Set up optimum conditions for them to complete a.
A typical online transaction can be divided intonine stepsInvitation to Computer Science Java Version Third Edition 9 Figure 13 1A Typical Online Transaction in Nine Steps.
Invitation to Computer Science Java Version Third Edition 10 Step 1 Getting There How can you get customers to your Web site Conventional advertising Obvious domain name.
Search engine PortalInvitation to Computer Science Java Version Third Edition 11 Step 2 Do I Know You Provide Web site personalization by.
Asking the user to register and then log in duringeach visit Using cookies Provide incentives and benefits for returnInvitation to Computer Science Java Version Third Edition 12.
Step 3 Committing to anOnline Purchase Must provide security for transmission ofsensitive information Encryption Encoding data to be transmitted into a.
scrambled form using a scheme agreed uponbetween the sender and the receiver Authentication Verifying the identify of thereceiver of your messageInvitation to Computer Science Java Version Third Edition 13.
Step 3 Committing to anOnline Purchase continued SSL secure sockets layer A series of protocols that allow a client and a Web Agree on encryption methods.
Exchange security keys Authenticate the identity of each partyInvitation to Computer Science Java Version Third Edition 14 Steps 4 and 5 PaymentProcessing.
Most common payment option Credit card Option 1 Step 4 Online order form communicates with theaccounting system Step 5 Accounting system verifies the customer s.
credit and processes the transaction on the flyInvitation to Computer Science Java Version Third Edition 15 Steps 4 and 5 PaymentProcessing continued Option 2.
Step 4 Collect information on the customer s Step 5 Evaluate the customer s credit andcomplete the transaction offlineInvitation to Computer Science Java Version Third Edition 16 Steps 6 9 Order Fulfillment.
Step 6 Order entry system alerts inventorysystem to reduce the items in stock Step 7 Order entry system contacts shippingsystem to arrange for shipping Steps 8 and 9 Shipping system works with the.
shipping company to pick up and deliver thepurchase to the customerInvitation to Computer Science Java Version Third Edition 17 Designing Your Web Site Web site taxonomy.
How information will be classified and organizedon the Web site CRM customer relationship management Improve your customer satisfaction Build customer relationships.
Bring people back to your Web site time and timeInvitation to Computer Science Java Version Third Edition 18 Designing Your Web Site continued Some important Web site components.
Site map Navigation bar Shopping carts Order checkout forms Shipping options.
E mail confirmations Privacy policyInvitation to Computer Science Java Version Third Edition 19 Designing Your Web Site continued .
Web pages should be designed to be displayedon different machines operating systems and Text only options should be offered for userswith slow connections the visually impaired andthe hearing impaired.
Invitation to Computer Science Java Version Third Edition 20 Behind the Scenes Businesses have many collaborative systems Developed by different vendors with different protocols Middleware Software that allows existing programs to communicate.
seamlessly Translates between incompatible data representations file formats andnetwork protocols Disaster recovery strategy Deals with backup sever failure intrusionsInvitation to Computer Science Java Version Third Edition 21.
Databases An electronic database Stores data items Data items can be extracted Data items can be sorted.
Data items can be manipulated to reveal newinformationInvitation to Computer Science Java Version Third Edition 22 Data Organization A group of eight bits.
Can store the binary representation of a singlecharacter or a small integer number A single unit of addressable memory A group of bytes used to represent a string ofcharacters.
Invitation to Computer Science Java Version Third Edition 23 Data Organization continued Record A collection of related fields.
Data file Related records are kept in a data file Database Related files make up a databaseInvitation to Computer Science Java Version Third Edition 24.
Figure 13 3Data Organization HierarchyInvitation to Computer Science Java Version Third Edition 25 Figure 13 4Records and Fields in a Single File.
Invitation to Computer Science Java Version Third Edition 26 Figure 13 5One Record in the Rugs For You Employees FileInvitation to Computer Science Java Version Third Edition 27 Database Management.
Database management system DBMS Manages the files in a database Relational database model Conceptual model of a file as a two dimensionalInvitation to Computer Science Java Version Third Edition 28.
Database ManagementSystems continued In a relational database A table represents information about an entity A row contains data about one instance of an.
A row is called a tuple Each category of information is called an attributeInvitation to Computer Science Java Version Third Edition 29 Figure 13 6Employees Table for Rugs For You.
Invitation to Computer Science Java Version Third Edition 30 Figure 13 7InsurancePolicies Table for Rugs For YouInvitation to Computer Science Java Version Third Edition 31 Database Management.
Systems continued Specialized query languages Enable the user or another application program toquery the database Example SQL Structured Query Language .
Relationships among different entities in a Established through the correspondence betweenprimary keys and foreign keysInvitation to Computer Science Java Version Third Edition 32 Figure 13 8.
Three Entities in the Rugs For You DatabaseInvitation to Computer Science Java Version Third Edition 33 Other Considerations Performance issues Large files are maintained on disk.
Organizing record storage on disk can minimizetime needed to access a particular record Creating additional records to be stored with thefile can significantly reduce access timeInvitation to Computer Science Java Version Third Edition 34.
Other Considerations continued Distributed databases Allow physical data to reside at separate andindependent locations that are networked.
Massive integrated government databases raiselegal political social and ethical issuesInvitation to Computer Science Java Version Third Edition 35 Information Security Information security.
Data protection whether on disk or transmittedacross a network Authentication Prevents access by hackers Encryption Makes data meaningless if hackers doInvitation to Computer Science Java Version Third Edition 36.
Encryption Overview Cryptography The science of secret writing Plaintext A message that is not encoded.
Ciphertext An encrypted messageInvitation to Computer Science Java Version Third Edition 37 Encryption Overview continued .
Process of encryption and decryption Plaintext is encrypted before it is sent Ciphertext is decrypted back to plaintext when it is A symmetric encryption algorithm Requires a secret key known to both the sender.
and receiver Sender encrypts the plaintext using the key Receiver decrypts the message using the keyInvitation to Computer Science Java Version Third Edition 38 Encryption Overview.
continued Asymmetric encryption algorithm Also called public key encryption algorithm The key for encryption and the key for decryptionare different.
Person A makes an encryption key public Anyone can encrypt a message using the publickey and send it to A Only A has the decryption key and can decrypt theInvitation to Computer Science Java Version Third Edition 39.
Simple EncryptionAlgorithms Caesar Cipher Caesar cipher Also called a shift cipher Each character in the message is shifted to.
another character some fixed distance fartheralong in the alphabet Stream cipher Encodes one character at a time Substitution cipher A single letter of plaintextgenerates a single letter of ciphertext.
Invitation to Computer Science Java Version Third Edition 40 Block Cipher A group or block of plaintext letters getsencoded into a block of ciphertext but not bysubstituting one at a time for each character.
Each plaintext character in the block contributesto more than one ciphertext characterInvitation to Computer Science Java Version Third Edition 41 Block Cipher continued One ciphertext character is created as a result of.
more than one plaintext letter Diffusion scattering of the plaintext within theciphertextInvitation to Computer Science Java Version Third Edition 42 Stands for Data Encryption Standard.
Designed to protect electronic information A block cipher Blocks 64 bits long Key 64 bit binary key only 56 bits are used Invitation to Computer Science Java Version Third Edition 43.
DES continued Every substitution reduction expansion andpermutation is determined by a well known set The same algorithm serves as the decryptionInvitation to Computer Science Java Version Third Edition 44.
Figure 13 11The DES Encryption AlgorithmInvitation to Computer Science Java Version Third Edition 45 DES continued Triple DES.
Improves the security of DES Requires two 56 bit keys Runs the DES algorithm three times AES Advanced Encryption Standard Uses successive rounds of computations that mix.
up the data and the key Key length 128 192 or 256 bitsInvitation to Computer Science Java Version Third Edition 46 Public Key Systems Most common public key encryption algorithm.
Based on results from number theory If n is a large number it is extremely difficult tofind the prime factors for n RSA is often used in the initial stage ofcommunication between client and server.
Invitation to Computer Science Java Version Third Edition 47 Figure 13 12An SSL SessionInvitation to Computer Science Java Version Third Edition 48 E business Every part of a financial transaction.
Chapter 13: Electronic Commerce and Information Security Invitation to Computer Science, Java Version, Third Edition Objectives In this chapter, you will learn about E-commerce Databases Information security Introduction E-commerce: Financial transactions conducted by electronic means Early days (early- and mid-1990s) of online commerce A customer fills out an order via the Web and submits it ...

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