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Responding to Problem Behaviors Socially Mediated vs EmotionallyDiana Browning Wright M S L E P The ACEs Study Implications Adverse Childhood Experiences ACE Study.
Calculate yourself but keep it private Calculate 2 different students with behavior issues forwhom you know their background very wellHERE WE GO Diana Browning Wright M S L E P .
What Are ACEs Adverse Childhood Experiences ACEs are experiences in childhood thatare unhappy unpleasant hurtful Sometimes.
referred to as toxicstress or childhoodDiana Browning Wright M S L E P Adverse ChildhoodExperiences Survey.
Let s Review the Implications An ACE Score of 4 or more results in having multiple riskfactors for these diseases or the disease themselves An ACE score of 6 or more results in a 20 year decrease in lifeexpectancy.
Diana Browning Wright M S L E P Stress Wigs Kids Out and us too Homeostatic balance a state of homeostasis having an ideal bodytemperature an ideal level of glucose in the bloodstream an ideal everything Stressor anything that knocks you out of homeostatic balance.
Diana Browning Wright M S L E P Allostatic LoadWhen Stress Becomes Too Much Allostatic load the wear and tear onthe mind and body that results from.
either too much stress or inability tomanage stress Not turning off the stress responsewhen it is no longer needed Response to perceived stressors.
that never even happen Inability to manage the intensityof stressors in the momentDiana Browning Wright M S L E P Negative Impact of High Allostatic Load.
On our body On our mind On our behavior Headache Anxiety Angry outbursts Muscle tension or pain Restlessness Avoidance of important Cardiovascular Lack of motivation activities Fatigue Memory problems Overeating or undereating.
Change in sex drive Irritability anger Social withdrawal Stomach upset Sadness or depression Drug or alcohol abuse Sleep problemsDiana Browning Wright M S L E P Adverse Childhood Experiences ACES Study.
Of 17 000 respondents two thirds had at leat one adversechildhood event Physical emotional or sexual abuse Emotional or physical neglect Growing up with family members with mental illness alcoholism.
or drug problems Family violence Incarcerated family member One or no parents Parental divorce.
Diana Browning Wright M S L E P FindingsOf the 17 000 respondents Two thirds had at least 1 adverse childhood event 1 in 6 people had four or more ACES.
More than 25 grew up in a household with analcoholic or drug user 25 had been beaten as childrenDiana Browning Wright M S L E P Findings Continued.
People with ACE scores of 4 or more Twice as likely to smoke Seven times as likely to be alcoholics Six times as likely to have had sex before age 15 Twice as likely to have cancer or heart disease.
Twelve times more likely to have attempted suicide Men with six or more ACEs were 46 times more likely tohave injected drugs than men with no history of adversechildhood experiencesDiana Browning Wright M S L E P .
Diana Browning Wright M S L E P Three Tiered RtI Model for Behavior and Social Emotional SupportSelect an approach based on whether behavior is sociallymediated vs emotionally driven Cognitive Behavior Therapy Counseling CBT .
Tier 3 FBA based BIP with replacement behavior training Wrap Around and other parent focused assistance High risk Students Inter agency servicesIndividual Interventions Likely to be sufficient for 3 5 of.
Select a behavior intervention matched tostudent characteristics Self monitoring Structured adult mentor programTier 2 e g check in check out .
Daily home school notes At risk Students Behavior contractsIntensified classroom and small group interventions Small group social skills or SEL training Likely to be sufficient for 7 10 of students Escape Card Positive Peer Reporting.
UNIVERSAL SCREENING Positive Behavioral Supports www pbis org 16 proven proactive classroom management strategiesTier 1 Social Emotional Learning SEL Curriculum www casel org All Students .
KFFC Kind Firm Fair Consistent teachingCulturally responsive environments Positive relationships with all studentsclassroom strategies with accommodation planning Physiology for learning instruction Likely to be sufficient for 85 90 of students diet sleep exercise stress management Graphic by Diana Browning Wright.
Diana Browning Wright M S L E P Why not stop light Card Pulling vs Rainbow ClubSee handout Classwide systems On www pent ca gov for Rainbow Club.
Compare and ContrastRainbow Club Card Pulling Stop LightA class wide system focused on drawing A class wide system featuring drawingattention to rule following behavior class attention to rule breakingMaintains and Enhances Disrupts teacher student s relationships.
Teacher Student s relationshipsConsistent with behavioral theory Inconsistent with behavior theory Itprogressive shaping reinforcing of focuses on finding students to publicallybehavior with built in response cost that show they aren t like you emphasizesallows correction without rejection basic punishment as the overarching control.
human needs enhances a sense of method can disrupt sense of belongingDiana Browning Wright M S L E P Compare and ContrastRainbow Club Card Pulling Stop LightAllows for private response cost lowering Often the restoration is not immediate.
to the color below the current and has side effects on class climate inachievement of the student in a private that some children fear the teacher maymanner then catch em being good to pull their card and humiliate themrestore as soon as possible randomlyAll students begin at the bottom every All students are at top level green and.
several days no student stays at lowest the only place to go is down rather thanlevel for more than an hour motivating all students to go upAllows teacher to walk around with cues Allows teacher to walk around looking for colored cards to award the next layer in violationsthe rainbow.
No payoff for achievementPayoff daily is by achievement earned allstudents earn somethingDiana Browning Wright M S L E P Moving To Behavior Intervention Plan.
BIP Or Other Tier 3 Socially mediated vs emotionally driven Socially Mediated i e externally reinforced behavior is to get something or to reject escapesomething in an environment.
Emotionally Driven i e internally reinforced or aresponse to previous trauma triggered now in thisenvironmentDiana Browning Wright M S L E P BIP Examples Of Behaviors.
Examples of socially mediated behaviors that may nothave not responded to default behavior interventionsand therefore require a BIP include Hitting others in protest escape their behaviors orhitting to get their attention.
Making sexually explicit remarks to get laughs from Refusing to do work to escape the task requirement or the class Etc etc Diana Browning Wright M S L E P .
Socially Mediated Behaviors In BIPs Replacement behavior training Socially mediated behaviors require instruction on skillfuluse of a functionally equivalent replacement behavior FERB when default interventions failed.
Reinforcement of overall positive behaviors as well as Specification of how staff should respond if and whenproblem behavior occurs again Progress Monitoring and Two Way CommunicationDiana Browning Wright M S L E P .
Cognitive Behavior Therapy CBT AndOther Evidence Based Therapy Counseling Anxiety triggered by fear of failure or separationanxiety or selective mutism that is not seeking a.
response from the environment and does notrespond to environmental changes and defaultbehavior interventions These require a specificprotocol to address the emotions e g a cognitivebehavioral treatment plan .
Depressed withdrawn behaviors not seeking aresponse from the environment that have notresponded to lesser interventions that haveattempted to behaviorally activate require acognitive behavioral treatment plan .
Diana Browning Wright M S L E P Emotionally Driven Examples School Phobia and other phobias that require aspecific evidence based protocol to systematicallydesensitize the student to stress provoking stimuli .
CBT approaches Habits such as tic disorders that require an evidencebased Habit Reversal Protocol CBT approaches Repetitive genital rubbing pleasure seeking thathas not responded to environmental changes to.
enhance engagement and is not associated with childabuse non FERB based Direct Treatment protocol Diana Browning Wright M S L E P Emotionally Driven Examples Separation Anxiety Selective Mutism etc.
Post Traumatic Stress Disorder PTSD Other Trauma DisordersEvidence Based Treatment Required See www pent ca gov forms for a Direct Treatment ProtocolDiana Browning Wright M S L E P .
Reminder Quality BIPsAll effective plans are a movie not a snapshot Change environment variables Teach alternative acceptable replacement behaviors FERB and General Positive Behavior Skills.
Reinforce general positive behavior AND use ofFunctionally Equivalent Replacement Behavior Safely and productively handle problem behaviorwhen if it occurs again Two way Communicate with key stakeholders.
Includes a Progress Monitoring ScheduleDiana Browning Wright M S L E P Diana Browning Wright Initiatives and TrainingDiana Browning Wright M S L E P Diana Browning Wright Initiatives and Training.
Diana Browning Wright M S L E P Diana Browning Wright Initiatives and TrainingDiana Browning Wright M S L E P Evaluating Your Functional BehaviorAssessment FBA Report.
Were all elements that document process andconclusions included Did you specify that a BIP is appropriate for theSee Checklist for Complete FBA Reports and a modelFBA report at www pent ca gov forms.
Diana Browning Wright M S L E P FBA Report Diana Browning Wright Initiatives and TrainingDiana Browning Wright M S L E P Diana Browning Wright Initiatives and Training.
Diana Browning Wright M S L E P Diana Browning Wright Initiatives and TrainingDiana Browning Wright M S L E P BIP Desk Reference And BIP QE II Use to train staff on the key concepts of applied.
behavioral analysis and behavior intervention plansDownload the 345 page manual for free www pent ca govDiana Browning Wright M S L E P Multiple Purposes For BIP QE II.
Use to keep proper focus balance between positivebehavioral interventions and potential futuredisciplinary considerations Use when a BIP has not been successful Use to improve your ability to legally defend the.
team s Behavior PlanDiana Browning Wright M S L E P What The BIP QE II Does NOT Measure Whether the new behaviors interventions environmental changes and reinforcers fit the.
Whether the behavior was socially mediated orinternally driven Whether this plan is developmentallyappropriate for this studentSee http www pent ca gov beh dev d... .
Diana Browning Wright M S L E P BIP QE II Does NOT Measure Fidelity Whether the plan was or will be implementedconsistently and skillfully This takes observation data analysis and review.
Diana Browning Wright M S L E P Peer Reviewed Journal Publicationswww pent ca gov hom research h... Cook C R Mayer G R Browning Wright D Kraemer B Gale B Wallace M D 2012 Exploring the link between.
evidence based quality of behavior intervention plans treatment integrity and student outcomes under naturaleducational conditions The Journal of Special Education 46 Kraemer B R Cook C R Browning Wright D Mayer G R Wallace M D 2008 Effects of training on the use of the.
Behavior Support Plan Quality Evaluation Guide with autismeducators A preliminary investigation examining positivebehavior support plans Journal of Positive BehaviorInterventions 179 189 Diana Browning Wright M S L E P .
Peer Reviewed Journal Publicationswww pent ca gov hom research h... Cook C R Crews D Browning Wright D Mayer R Gale B Kraemer B 2007 Establishing and evaluating thesubstantive adequacy of positive behavior support plans .
Journal of Behavioral Education 16 191 206 Browning Wright D Mayer G R Cook C R Crews D A method of learning behavior analysis and improving quality of plans. A method of evaluation of the extent to which your plan is in alignment with the field of behavior analysis. A method of improving likely fidelity once the plan is approved. A method of improving outcomes for students. Diana Browning Wright, M.S., L.E.P.

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